Collaborate With Us

As a career advisor, faculty member, or higher ed administrator who supports graduate students and postdocs, you can use InterSECT job simulations to:

  • enhance peer group interactions
  • complement career exploration workshops by adding an active learning activity
  • deepen conversations during career advising sessions
  • engage alumni as presenters

We’ve created materials to help you adopt this program at your institution. Find content below to:

  • introduce the job sims to graduate students and postdocs; including suggestions for activities
  • introduce job sims to staff who wish to add InterSECT job sims to their services
  • evaluate the experience
  • develop job sims, including a detailed protocol
Introduction to InterSECT

Interested in sharing InterSECT at your institution with staff, faculty, or students? We share introductory text, slides, and sample marketing emails. The emails have been used to advertise info sessions that introduced grad students and postdocs to the InterSECT job sims at UC-San Francisco.

Please feel free to customize the information as needed. If you have questions about implementation, please contact Thi Nguyen at thi.nguyen@wustl.edu.

Click the collaborator packet below to download all of the components listed above, including suggested activities and case studies.

InterSECT_CollaboratorPacket_Full

InterSECT Develop A Sim

Read through how we created a job simulation. We break down the process and include step-by-step instructions for how to interview the professional and get details for the tasks.

You will be developing a job simulation task based on a career you may know little to nothing about. Use the interview questions provided and rely on the professional’s expertise. Make sure they suggest a task by the end of your interview. This protocol has been used by several graduate students, postdocs, and staff. We hope that it’s easy to follow for you, too!

Developing a Job Simulation – Template

Sample Evaluation Qs

At Washington University in St. Louis and UC-San Francisco, we assessed the effectiveness of job sims in helping graduate students and postdocs learn about their career field of interest. We also wanted to evaluate whether their interest and confidence in exploring that career field changed after performing the job sim tasks.

We share our evaluation questions here, in case you can find them useful as you start to implement this program at your institution. We have also created an anonymous evaluation that can be taken by any student at any university. If you’d like to use this link, please let us know. We are happy to share the data and can summarize it for you, too. If you’re interested, contact Thi Nguyen at thi.nguyen@wustl.edu.

All collaborator resources can be downloaded and viewed here.

Thank you for your interest in bringing interactive simulation exercises to your graduate students and postdocs.


Sims by Collaborators

Emory University

UC Davis

UC-San Francisco

Washington University in St. Louis

Boston University and Duke University collaborated and contributed to the Resource and Skills sections of the Sciences Sims Library.